Shelby County Public Defender Chairs ACE Awareness Board

ACE Awareness Foundation an effort to help parents, caregivers limit or prevent a child’s chronic exposure to trauma

Shelby County Public Defender Stephen Bush has been named the new chair of the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Awareness Foundation board.

“As the public defender, I see daily the consequences of adverse childhood experiences in the lives of the thousands of children bumping up against juvenile court,” said Stephen Bush, Shelby County Public Defender.

 

“In fact, 93% of youth in detention have survived repeated trauma. This strong correlation between trauma and contact with juvenile court is undeniable and something that we, as parents and as community, cannot afford to ignore.”

Bush has served on the ACEs Task Force since it was founded in 2014. The task force launched the ACE Awareness Foundation. Since then, the foundation has created two Universal Parenting Places (UPPs) which provide any parent who walks through their doors with counseling and information involving family-related issues or concerns. In July, ACEs also opened the “Warm Line” — a free, live telephone line that connects parents with trained professionals who provide parenting guidance and support.

“We’ve known for many years about the link between early childhood traumas and future justice system involvement,” said Bush. “What is becoming increasingly clear, though, is that toxic stress experienced during childhood is crippling to a child in ways far beyond problems at school or an encounter with the justice system.”

For his first public outreach as ACE Awareness Foundation board chair, Bush appeared on the Commercial Appeal’s ‘Talk, Memphis’ podcast hosted by journalist David Waters.

“It’s about fundamental fairness. Which is really what our work at the public defender’s office is about. We are appointed to represent individuals that can’t afford counsel, because I believe everyone deserves a fair shake. The Constitution requires it,” said Bush on the podcast. “But if you take that same idea, certainly every kid born in this community should have a fair shake and a healthy life – to live a healthy and whole life.”

“I can tell you, if we get this right about reducing and preventing Adverse Childhood Experiences, we can begin to talk about reducing the size of our criminal justice system, right-sizing our juvenile justice system and the savings that could come from that could very well fund anything we need to do in public education.” 

You can listen to the entire podcast here

Learn more about the work the ACE Awareness Foundation is doing to increase knowledge among policy makers, state and local leaders and citizens about the effects and causes of toxic stress in this piece that aired in April of 2016 on PBS Newshour.  You can watch the entire segment here.

Check out the ACE Awareness Foundation website and follow them on Facebook and Twitter.

 

Shelby County’s Jericho Project Wins National ‘Innovations in Criminal Justice’ Award

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Memphis, TN, 2/20/2015 –  The Shelby County Jericho Project has been chosen as one of eight programs across the country approaching criminal justice challenges in new and effective ways. The recipients of the 2015 “Innovations in Criminal Justice Award” were selected by the Association of Prosecuting Attorneys (APA) in partnership with the U.S. Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) and the Center for Court Innovation.

“I am delighted that we can bring together a multidisciplinary group of criminal justice leaders to discuss initiatives that are examples of a more efficient and effective justice system,” said BJA’s Director Denise O’Donnell. “The program highlights the most innovative criminal justice programs across the nation, but also provides summit participants with the requisite knowledge and skills necessary to implement or replicate these practices in their own jurisdictions.”

The Jericho Project was launched more than a decade ago by the Shelby County Public Defender’s Office to better serve people living with serious mental illness and substance use disorders who were cycling through the criminal justice system.

The main architect of the Jericho Project is Shelby County Chief Public Defender, Stephen Bush. He developed the initiative while an Assistant Public Defender, a position he held for almost 20 years before being appointed Shelby County’s 10th Public Defender in 2010.

“The Jericho Project has helped break down barriers to recovery for hundreds of people since it launched more than a decade ago,” said Bush. “We are honored that a program developed in Shelby County is being recognized as a national model. And particularly so, that this recognition comes from leading national prosecutors. Supporting people who live with addiction and mental illness as they transition from jail to our community is vital work, and we hope this award helps other communities develop better ways of doing it.”

Nearly 60% of those participating in Jericho have successfully completed their recovery plans and also avoided further contact with the criminal justice system. By building linkage plans to community treatment and services tailored to client needs, this comprehensive approach has cut in half the recidivism rate typically found among those with serious mental illness.

The Jericho Project will be recognized at the “Innovations in Criminal Justice Summit III” April  20-21, 2015 in Los Angeles.

Media Contact: Josh Spickler  901.216.2024  josh.spickler@shelbycountytn.gov

Download Media Release PDF Here

Shelby County Public Defenders Named 2014 Memphis Bar Foundation Fellows

2014 Memphis Bar FoundationEach has served indigent clients in the Memphis area for more than two decades — now assistant Shelby County Public Defenders Jack Green and James Etta Rayford have been named Fellows of the Memphis Bar Foundation.  Green and Rayford were recognized at a November event in Downtown Memphis.

Green has been a public defender for 26 years and is a supervising attorney for the office. Currently, he serves as the Director of Performance Metrics for the public defender’s office. Green collects case data that help manage attorney workloads.

He is also the head of the Justice System Administration, which tracks client movement through the criminal justice system, monitors progress and identifies delays.

Rayford has practiced public defense for the past 24 years. Most recently, she joined the Juvenile Defender Unit, a highly-specialized division of the Shelby County Public Defender’s office which represents children in juvenile court.  Rayford chose to serve on the new unit soon after it was established in 2013. The new defender unit was developed to help meet the agreement between Shelby County government, Shelby County Juvenile Court and the Department of Justice.

After the Civil Rights Division of the DOJ found due process and equal protection violations at Juvenile Court, the Shelby County Public Defender’s Office was called upon to provide attorneys for the defense of children and to supervise the defense function of Shelby County’s juvenile justice system.

Members of the Memphis Bar Foundation elect fellows based on ethics and professionalism.  Eligible nominees must have practiced law at least 10 years. The Memphis Bar Foundation is the charitable arm of the Memphis Bar Association.