Shelby County’s Jericho Project Wins National ‘Innovations in Criminal Justice’ Award

6d467-jericho_newtag_cmyk_vert_mac-tif-scaled1000FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Memphis, TN, 2/20/2015 –  The Shelby County Jericho Project has been chosen as one of eight programs across the country approaching criminal justice challenges in new and effective ways. The recipients of the 2015 “Innovations in Criminal Justice Award” were selected by the Association of Prosecuting Attorneys (APA) in partnership with the U.S. Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) and the Center for Court Innovation.

“I am delighted that we can bring together a multidisciplinary group of criminal justice leaders to discuss initiatives that are examples of a more efficient and effective justice system,” said BJA’s Director Denise O’Donnell. “The program highlights the most innovative criminal justice programs across the nation, but also provides summit participants with the requisite knowledge and skills necessary to implement or replicate these practices in their own jurisdictions.”

The Jericho Project was launched more than a decade ago by the Shelby County Public Defender’s Office to better serve people living with serious mental illness and substance use disorders who were cycling through the criminal justice system.

The main architect of the Jericho Project is Shelby County Chief Public Defender, Stephen Bush. He developed the initiative while an Assistant Public Defender, a position he held for almost 20 years before being appointed Shelby County’s 10th Public Defender in 2010.

“The Jericho Project has helped break down barriers to recovery for hundreds of people since it launched more than a decade ago,” said Bush. “We are honored that a program developed in Shelby County is being recognized as a national model. And particularly so, that this recognition comes from leading national prosecutors. Supporting people who live with addiction and mental illness as they transition from jail to our community is vital work, and we hope this award helps other communities develop better ways of doing it.”

Nearly 60% of those participating in Jericho have successfully completed their recovery plans and also avoided further contact with the criminal justice system. By building linkage plans to community treatment and services tailored to client needs, this comprehensive approach has cut in half the recidivism rate typically found among those with serious mental illness.

The Jericho Project will be recognized at the “Innovations in Criminal Justice Summit III” April  20-21, 2015 in Los Angeles.

Media Contact: Josh Spickler  901.216.2024  josh.spickler@shelbycountytn.gov

Download Media Release PDF Here

Shelby County Public Defender Addresses Journalists on National Panel

Stephen Bush, Shelby County Public Defender
Stephen Bush, Shelby County Public Defender

Earlier this month, Shelby County Public Defender Stephen Bush spoke to journalists from across the country at City University New York.  Bush was an invited panelist for the John Jay College Center on Media, Crime and Justice symposium entitled “Kids, Crime and Justice” held in New York City.

The symposium was designed to help journalists apply research and best practices to reporting on juvenile justice issues.  Bush was one of twenty presenters invited to New York to address reporters from print, broadcast and online. These twenty-five journalists were selected for a Tow Foundation fellowship based on their interest in covering juvenile justice related stories.

Bush was invited to discuss research involving early brain development in children and the traumatic effects of poverty and exposure to violence and abuse. He was also asked to address how these factors can and should influence treatment and sentencing.

The Shelby County Public Defender’s Office was required to supervise juvenile defense by the 2012 Memorandum of Agreement between the Department of Justice and Shelby County.  A new, specially-trained unit of the public defender’s office began taking cases in Juvenile Court early this year. This marked the first time the public defender has been responsible for juvenile defense since the 1970s.

Screenshot 2014-10-16 01.03.38You can read more about the conference in this article from The Crime Report or by following #KidsCrimeJustice on Twitter.

You can also listen to Bush discuss the challenges and opportunities surrounding juvenile justice in Shelby County in this NPR report that aired in September.

 

NPR Explores Progress, Remaining Challenges at Shelby County Juvenile Court

“This work is going to take time; it’s going to take deep commitment. But we really are talking about justice for a new generation.” – Stephen Bush, Shelby County Chief Public Defender

Screenshot 2014-08-06 10.45.39

It’s a long game — the reform of the Shelby County Juvenile Court.  As this recent story on NPR’s Morning Edition illustrates so well, there is still a very long way to go.

Whether you’ve been keeping up with the stories about Shelby County Juvenile Court reform or not, this piece by NPR provides a good overview of changes that have taken place since a scathing investigation by the Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division was released in 2012.

The report claimed that Shelby County’s Juvenile Court has been responsible for systemic violation of due process rights for children. Perhaps more damaging, the DOJ conducted a detailed analysis of five years of court data that showed the court treated black children more harshly than white children. This disparity was most stark in cases where children were facing transfer to the adult system.

In the 2013 Memorandum of Agreement between the DOJ, Shelby County and the Juvenile Court, the Shelby County Public Defender’s Office was tapped to oversee the transformation of the juvenile defender function.  This marked the first time the Public Defender had been directly responsible for defending children in forty years.

The office’s newly formed Juvenile Defender Unit began taking cases at the start of 2014.  By late August or early September, the office will open a stand-alone juvenile defender center next to the court. The new center, renovated carefully with the needs of children and their families in mind, will provide a safe and welcoming environment for this new, difficult and highly-specialized advocacy.

You can listen to the story here.  Or read the transcript here, although we highly recommend the audio version.

The full DOJ report and the 2013 Memorandum of Agreement are available here.