Nationally Renowned Artist Brings Exhibit Featuring Incarcerated Children to Memphis

When juveniles are involved in violent acts — our tendency is to react in fear — and call for swift, harsh punishment. But according to our juvenile justice laws, we are charged with working to rehabilitate youth.

Developments in brain science in the last 30 years reinforce the mission of rehabilitation — that the minds of young people are malleable and primed for continued development and change. Yet, with this mission and what we know, the U.S. still leads the world in incarcerating children.

This weekend, artist Richard Ross brings his photography to Memphis to show what juvenile justice looks like in this country — and his message is stark and unblinking.

Some may be less inclined to worry about inhumane detention conditions when young people are accused of unthinkable acts of violence, but a recent study found that 75% of young people held in detention in the U.S. are kept in these often poor and sometimes abusive conditions … for non-violent offenses.

Richard Ross

This Friday, September 19th, Richard Ross will give a lecture about his work at the Art Museum of the University of Memphis.  His work will be displayed in Memphis through November.  Also on exhibit will be the work of local artist, Penny Dodd, who has interviewed more than 800 Memphis teens — as they give us insight into their young, complicated lives.

From the "Juvenile-in-Justice" exhibit by Richard Ross
From the “Juvenile-in-Justice” exhibit by Richard Ross

Friday, September 19th

5-7pm Opening reception @ the University of Memphis College of Fine Arts

Performance during reception by the latest Music Production workshop of storybooth

and also by the Visible Community Music School

7pm  Richard Ross Lecture

Saturday, September 20th

10am – Noon  Morning Coffee with the artists

Exhibit will remain open until November 26th, 2014.

Read this article by Richard Ross on the popular political website, The Hill.